Daily Nasal Hygiene: Tips to Keep Air Flowing For Less Nose Blowing

The nasal passage needs daily care just as the rest of your body does, yet it is often neglected. Here are 4 steps to take to ensure you show some love to the primary respiratory feature of the head.

  1. Clear the path

    Make sure you blow the nose and empty the sinus as much as possible prior to taking the next steps. In order to get the full benefit of the following steps a clear pathway must be established

  2. Clean the path

    Use a saline rinse to cleanse the nasal pathway. I personally recommend a saline rinse that has xylitol in it. Not only does the xylitol add a positive flavor to the rinse, but it also helps to reduce inflammation. Insert the nasal spray tip at the base of the nostril and spray twice on inhalation to ensure the saline goes through the airway and down the throat.

  3. Invigorate the path

    The NetiStik is a great tool to help relieve congestion. The aroma opens the nostrils and provides an optimal path for oxygen. Place the Netistik at the base of one nostril while using a thumb to gently cover the opening of the opposing nostril. Inhale and exhale deeply three times and repeat on opposing nostril.

  4. Open the path

    This nasal hygiene protocol can be performed at any time of day. However, it is best performed at night. For those who are unable to perform at night, simply save step 4 for bed. Use a nasal strip on the outside of nasal bridge and secure for the evening. The strip will aid in opening the nasal airway path as you sleep. This step offers a more restful night and several hours of nasal breathing.

Adobe Spark (22)

All three products can be found on Amazon or check your local retailer for availability. So get your nose flowing with air and stop the congestion that has you constantly blowing. You are four simple steps away from a more restful night of sleep and less nasal congestion.

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Author: airwaymatters

Karese Laguerre is a Registered Dental Hygienist and Orofacial Myologist. In her years of working with various patient populations in the dental field, she encountered similar trends and limitations in dental malocclusion and mouth-breathing. The correlation between the two became even more relevant as her own children grew in age and with the pursuit of extensive hours in continuing education she achieved training in treating the primary cause, improper oral resting posture. She is passionate about the education of airway matters to the general public.

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